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Endurance Drink Mix
Flow Formulas Endurance Drink Mix Bag
Flow Formulas Endurance Drink Mix Bag
Flow Formulas Endurance Drink Mix Bag
Flow Formulas Endurance Drink Mix Bag
Flow Formulas Endurance Drink Mix Bag
Flow Formulas Endurance Drink Mix Bag
Flow Formulas Endurance Drink Mix Bag
Flow Formulas Endurance Drink Mix Bag
Endurance Drink Mix

F.A.Qs

The Endurance Drink Mix is specifically designed as a sole source of fuel and fluid for endurance athletes performing continuous exercise greater than one hour.

The research on endurance athletes ingesting protein supplements (branched amino acids) during exercise have mixed results and predominantly do not show improved results in performance. [1- 4]

[1] Tarpey, M. D., Roberts, J. D., Kass, L. S., Tarpey, R. J., & Roberts, M. G. (2013). The ingestion of protein with a maltodextrin and fructose beverage on substrate utilisation and exercise performance. Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism, 38(12), 1245–1253. 

[2] Oosthuyse, T., Carstens, M., & Millen, A. (2015). Whey or Casein Hydrolysate with Carbohydrate for Metabolism and Performance in Cycling. International Journal of Sports Medicine, 36(08), 636–646. 

[3] Gui, Z., Sun, F., Si, G., Chen, Y. Effect of protein and carbohydrate solutions on performance and cognitive function in female recreational runners. Plos One. 2017 Oct 12;12(10):e0185982.

[4] Fink, H.H., Mikesky, A.E. (2015). Practical applications in sports nutrition. 4th ed. Burlington, MA: Jones & Barlett Learning.

Below shows the estimated energy expenditure of a 135 pound individual performing different types of exercise. As you can see the 360 calories consumed through Flow Formulas is still considerably less than the energy expended through exercise. [1]

Female Athlete 
Running 10 min/mile 550 kcal/hr 
Running 6:30 min/mile 825 kcal/hr 
Bicycling vigorous/racing 660 kcal/hr 
Swimming freestyle vigorous 550 kcal/hr

[1] Dunford, M., & Doyle, JA. (2015). Nutrition for sport and exercise. 3rd. ed. Stamford, CT: Cengage Learning.

Typically you will not need to ingest carbohydrates in activities lasting under 90 minutes. In exercise bouts of over 90 minutes it is important to start training your gut. Initially, some athletes may not be able to tolerate more than 60-75 grams per hour. If this is the case it is best to start with 60 grams per hour (two scoops) and work your way up to the full 90 grams per hour (three scoops) over a period of a month.

Research to date shows an increase in carbohydrate utilization, absorption, and power output with ratios greater than 0.7:1 with the lowest GI discomfort (stomach fullness, abdominal cramping, and nausea) at a ratio of 0.8:1. [1-3]

[1] O’Brien, W. J., & Rowlands, D. S. (2011). Fructose-maltodextrin ratio in a carbohydrate-electrolyte solution differentially affects exogenous carbohydrate oxidation rate, gut comfort, and performance. American Journal of Physiology-Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology, 300(1), G181–G189.

[2] O'Brien, W.J., Stannard, S.R., Clarke, J.A., Rowlands, D.S. Fructose–Maltodextrin Ratio Governs Exogenous and Other CHO Oxidation and Performance. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 45(9), 1814–1824.

[3] Rowlands, D. S., Houltham, S., Musa-Veloso, K., Brown, F., Paulionis, L., & Bailey, D. (2015b). Fructose–Glucose Composite Carbohydrates and Endurance Performance: Critical Review and Future Perspectives. Sports Medicine, 45(11), 1561–1576.

This recommendation is for single source carbohydrate solutions (glucose) as anything above 60 grams has showed delayed gastric emptying and increased abdominal distress. [1] In multisource carbohydrate solutions, absorption is significantly increased [2-5], one study even showed up to 55% more carbohydrate oxidation than single source carbohydrate solutions. [2]

[1]. Dunford, M., & Doyle, J. A. (2015). Nutrition for Sport and Exercise. 3rd. Ed. Stamford, CT: Cengage Learning.

[2] Roberts, J. D., Tarpey, M. D., Kass, L. S., Tarpey, R. J., & Roberts, M. G. (2014). Assessing a Commercially Available Sports Drink on Exogenous Carbohydrate Oxidation, Fluid Delivery and Sustained Exercise Performance. Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition, 11(1), 1–14.

[3] Jentjens, R. L. P. G., Moseley, L., Waring, R. H., Harding, L. K., & Jeukendrup, A. E. (2004). Oxidation of Combined Ingestion of Glucose and Fructose During Exercise. Journal of Applied Physiology, 96(4), 1277–1284.

[4] Jentjens, R. L. P. G., Underwood, K., Achten, J., Currell, K., Mann, C. H., & Jeukendrup, A. E. (2006). Exogenous Carbohydrate Oxidation Rates are Elevated After Combined Ingestion of Glucose and Fructose During Exercise in the Heat. Journal of Applied Physiology, 100(3), 807–816.

[5] Rowlands, D. S., Houltham, S., Musa-Veloso, K., Brown, F., Paulionis, L., & Bailey, D. (2015). Fructose–Glucose Composite Carbohydrates and Endurance Performance: Critical Review and Future Perspectives. Sports Medicine, 45(11), 1561–1576.

The original purpose of the 6-8% solution guideline was to prevent slowing of gastric emptying which leads to GI distress. Multiple studies prove that solutions with multiple carbohydrate sources (i.e. glucose and fructose) increase gastric emptying and allow much higher than a 8% carbohydrate solution without additional GI distress. [1-6] What does all this mean? Consuming a multisource carbohydrate solution allows you to absorb more energy for better performance. [3]

[1] Shi, X., Summers, R.W., Schedl, H.P., Flanagan, S.W., Chang, R., Gisolfi, C.V. (1995) Effects of Carbohydrate Type and Concentration and Solution Osmolality on Water Absorption. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise. Dec;27(12):1607-15.

[2] Jeukendrup, A. E., & Moseley, L. (2010). Multiple Transportable Carbohydrates Enhance Gastric Emptying and Fluid Delivery. Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports, 20(1), 112–121.

[3] Roberts, J. D., Tarpey, M. D., Kass, L. S., Tarpey, R. J., & Roberts, M. G. (2014). Assessing a Commercially Available Sports Drink on Exogenous Carbohydrate Oxidation, Fluid Delivery and Sustained Exercise Performance. Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition, 11(1), 8.

[4] Jentjens, R. L. P. G., Moseley, L., Waring, R. H., Harding, L. K., & Jeukendrup, A. E. (2004). Oxidation of Combined Ingestion of Glucose and Fructose During Exercise. Journal of Applied Physiology, 96(4), 1277–1284.

[5] JJentjens, R. L. P. G., Underwood, K., Achten, J., Currell, K., Mann, C. H., & Jeukendrup, A. E. (2006). Exogenous carbohydrate oxidation rates are elevated after combined ingestion of glucose and fructose during exercise in the heat. Journal of Applied Physiology, 100(3), 807–816.

[6] Rowlands, D. S., Houltham, S., Musa-Veloso, K., Brown, F., Paulionis, L., & Bailey, D. (2015). Fructose–Glucose Composite Carbohydrates and Endurance Performance: Critical Review and Future Perspectives. Sports Medicine, 45(11), 1561–1576.

Many other hydration products contain other types electrolytes such as potassium and magnesium but according to research these do not show any further benefits to hydration or performance. [1]

[1] Vitale, K., & Getzin, A. (2019). Nutrition and Supplement Update for the Endurance Athlete: Review and Recommendations. Nutrients, 11(6), 1289.

The Endurance Drink Mix is free from the following top 12 allergens: peanuts, tree nuts, dairy, soy, gluten, egg, fish, shellfish, corn, sesame, coconut and mustard.

Finding corn-free ingredients for the Endurance Drink Mix was one of the biggest challenges in bringing this drink to the market. Almost all of the current endurance sports drinks use corn as a precursor for maltodextrin and citric acid. To get past this hurdle, we chose to use tapioca maltodextrin. It breaks down exactly like corn maltodextrin but removes the allergy symptoms that come from corn. Citric acid is typically derived from corn but can be found from a variety of fruits and plants. Our citric acid is derived from the molasses of beets and sugar cane.

Originally, most of the research on caffeine and endurance athletes was at higher doses, 6 mg/kg and higher which would equate to 368 mg caffeine or about 3 cups coffee. According to research, caffeine enhances endurance performance in amounts of 3 mg/kg with little to no increased benefits in higher dosages. [1,2] Flow Formulas contains 184 mg caffeine which equates to about 3 mg/kg for a 135 pound individual.

[1] Desbrow, B., Biddulph, C., Devlin, B., Grant, G. D., Anoopkumar-Dukie, S., & Leveritt, M. D. The effects of different doses of caffeine on endurance cycling time trial performance. Journal of Sports Sciences. 2012 Dec; 30(2), 115-120.

[2] Desbrow, B., Irwin, C., Ellis, A., Okeeffe, B., Grant, G., & Leveritt, M. Caffeine Withdrawal and High Intensity Endurance Cycling Performance. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise. 2011 Mar; 42, 106.

Below is a chart on how to train your gut to tolerate 90 grams of carbohydrate per hour.

Endurance Drink Mix

Regular price $39.99

This product is created specifically for endurance athletes performing over 60 minutes of continuous exercise. 

  • Developed from current sports performance research 
  • Replaces needed nutrients during hard racing and training efforts 
  • Top 12 allergen free
  • Exceptional taste
  • With caffeine contains 184 mg caffeine to boost performance (3 scoops)

Ingredients: organic tapioca maltodextrin, organic agave powder, citric acid, sea salt, fruit, rice maltodextrin. In caffeinated blends: caffeine extracted from green coffee beans.

    Directions: Mix 2-3 scoops with 16-24 ounces (2-3) cups of water. Shake vigorously and let dissolve for 15 minutes.*  

    Below is a chart on how to train your gut to tolerate 90 grams of carbohydrate per hour. 

    chart description of how to train gut over weeks

    *Powder texture variability and small clumps are normal. This will dissolve in water. The raspberry and strawberry flavors may contain seeds naturally found in whole raspberries and strawberries. 

    F.A.Qs

    The Endurance Drink Mix is specifically designed as a sole source of fuel and fluid for endurance athletes performing continuous exercise greater than one hour.

    The research on endurance athletes ingesting protein supplements (branched amino acids) during exercise have mixed results and predominantly do not show improved results in performance. [1- 4]

    [1] Tarpey, M. D., Roberts, J. D., Kass, L. S., Tarpey, R. J., & Roberts, M. G. (2013). The ingestion of protein with a maltodextrin and fructose beverage on substrate utilisation and exercise performance. Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism, 38(12), 1245–1253. 

    [2] Oosthuyse, T., Carstens, M., & Millen, A. (2015). Whey or Casein Hydrolysate with Carbohydrate for Metabolism and Performance in Cycling. International Journal of Sports Medicine, 36(08), 636–646. 

    [3] Gui, Z., Sun, F., Si, G., Chen, Y. Effect of protein and carbohydrate solutions on performance and cognitive function in female recreational runners. Plos One. 2017 Oct 12;12(10):e0185982.

    [4] Fink, H.H., Mikesky, A.E. (2015). Practical applications in sports nutrition. 4th ed. Burlington, MA: Jones & Barlett Learning.

    Below shows the estimated energy expenditure of a 135 pound individual performing different types of exercise. As you can see the 360 calories consumed through Flow Formulas is still considerably less than the energy expended through exercise. [1]

    Female Athlete 
    Running 10 min/mile 550 kcal/hr 
    Running 6:30 min/mile 825 kcal/hr 
    Bicycling vigorous/racing 660 kcal/hr 
    Swimming freestyle vigorous 550 kcal/hr

    [1] Dunford, M., & Doyle, JA. (2015). Nutrition for sport and exercise. 3rd. ed. Stamford, CT: Cengage Learning.

    Typically you will not need to ingest carbohydrates in activities lasting under 90 minutes. In exercise bouts of over 90 minutes it is important to start training your gut. Initially, some athletes may not be able to tolerate more than 60-75 grams per hour. If this is the case it is best to start with 60 grams per hour (two scoops) and work your way up to the full 90 grams per hour (three scoops) over a period of a month.

    Research to date shows an increase in carbohydrate utilization, absorption, and power output with ratios greater than 0.7:1 with the lowest GI discomfort (stomach fullness, abdominal cramping, and nausea) at a ratio of 0.8:1. [1-3]

    [1] O’Brien, W. J., & Rowlands, D. S. (2011). Fructose-maltodextrin ratio in a carbohydrate-electrolyte solution differentially affects exogenous carbohydrate oxidation rate, gut comfort, and performance. American Journal of Physiology-Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology, 300(1), G181–G189.

    [2] O'Brien, W.J., Stannard, S.R., Clarke, J.A., Rowlands, D.S. Fructose–Maltodextrin Ratio Governs Exogenous and Other CHO Oxidation and Performance. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 45(9), 1814–1824.

    [3] Rowlands, D. S., Houltham, S., Musa-Veloso, K., Brown, F., Paulionis, L., & Bailey, D. (2015b). Fructose–Glucose Composite Carbohydrates and Endurance Performance: Critical Review and Future Perspectives. Sports Medicine, 45(11), 1561–1576.

    This recommendation is for single source carbohydrate solutions (glucose) as anything above 60 grams has showed delayed gastric emptying and increased abdominal distress. [1] In multisource carbohydrate solutions, absorption is significantly increased [2-5], one study even showed up to 55% more carbohydrate oxidation than single source carbohydrate solutions. [2]

    [1]. Dunford, M., & Doyle, J. A. (2015). Nutrition for Sport and Exercise. 3rd. Ed. Stamford, CT: Cengage Learning.

    [2] Roberts, J. D., Tarpey, M. D., Kass, L. S., Tarpey, R. J., & Roberts, M. G. (2014). Assessing a Commercially Available Sports Drink on Exogenous Carbohydrate Oxidation, Fluid Delivery and Sustained Exercise Performance. Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition, 11(1), 1–14.

    [3] Jentjens, R. L. P. G., Moseley, L., Waring, R. H., Harding, L. K., & Jeukendrup, A. E. (2004). Oxidation of Combined Ingestion of Glucose and Fructose During Exercise. Journal of Applied Physiology, 96(4), 1277–1284.

    [4] Jentjens, R. L. P. G., Underwood, K., Achten, J., Currell, K., Mann, C. H., & Jeukendrup, A. E. (2006). Exogenous Carbohydrate Oxidation Rates are Elevated After Combined Ingestion of Glucose and Fructose During Exercise in the Heat. Journal of Applied Physiology, 100(3), 807–816.

    [5] Rowlands, D. S., Houltham, S., Musa-Veloso, K., Brown, F., Paulionis, L., & Bailey, D. (2015). Fructose–Glucose Composite Carbohydrates and Endurance Performance: Critical Review and Future Perspectives. Sports Medicine, 45(11), 1561–1576.

    The original purpose of the 6-8% solution guideline was to prevent slowing of gastric emptying which leads to GI distress. Multiple studies prove that solutions with multiple carbohydrate sources (i.e. glucose and fructose) increase gastric emptying and allow much higher than a 8% carbohydrate solution without additional GI distress. [1-6] What does all this mean? Consuming a multisource carbohydrate solution allows you to absorb more energy for better performance. [3]

    [1] Shi, X., Summers, R.W., Schedl, H.P., Flanagan, S.W., Chang, R., Gisolfi, C.V. (1995) Effects of Carbohydrate Type and Concentration and Solution Osmolality on Water Absorption. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise. Dec;27(12):1607-15.

    [2] Jeukendrup, A. E., & Moseley, L. (2010). Multiple Transportable Carbohydrates Enhance Gastric Emptying and Fluid Delivery. Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports, 20(1), 112–121.

    [3] Roberts, J. D., Tarpey, M. D., Kass, L. S., Tarpey, R. J., & Roberts, M. G. (2014). Assessing a Commercially Available Sports Drink on Exogenous Carbohydrate Oxidation, Fluid Delivery and Sustained Exercise Performance. Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition, 11(1), 8.

    [4] Jentjens, R. L. P. G., Moseley, L., Waring, R. H., Harding, L. K., & Jeukendrup, A. E. (2004). Oxidation of Combined Ingestion of Glucose and Fructose During Exercise. Journal of Applied Physiology, 96(4), 1277–1284.

    [5] JJentjens, R. L. P. G., Underwood, K., Achten, J., Currell, K., Mann, C. H., & Jeukendrup, A. E. (2006). Exogenous carbohydrate oxidation rates are elevated after combined ingestion of glucose and fructose during exercise in the heat. Journal of Applied Physiology, 100(3), 807–816.

    [6] Rowlands, D. S., Houltham, S., Musa-Veloso, K., Brown, F., Paulionis, L., & Bailey, D. (2015). Fructose–Glucose Composite Carbohydrates and Endurance Performance: Critical Review and Future Perspectives. Sports Medicine, 45(11), 1561–1576.

    Many other hydration products contain other types electrolytes such as potassium and magnesium but according to research these do not show any further benefits to hydration or performance. [1]

    [1] Vitale, K., & Getzin, A. (2019). Nutrition and Supplement Update for the Endurance Athlete: Review and Recommendations. Nutrients, 11(6), 1289.

    The Endurance Drink Mix is free from the following top 12 allergens: peanuts, tree nuts, dairy, soy, gluten, egg, fish, shellfish, corn, sesame, coconut and mustard.

    Finding corn-free ingredients for the Endurance Drink Mix was one of the biggest challenges in bringing this drink to the market. Almost all of the current endurance sports drinks use corn as a precursor for maltodextrin and citric acid. To get past this hurdle, we chose to use tapioca maltodextrin. It breaks down exactly like corn maltodextrin but removes the allergy symptoms that come from corn. Citric acid is typically derived from corn but can be found from a variety of fruits and plants. Our citric acid is derived from the molasses of beets and sugar cane.

    Finding corn-free ingredients for the Endurance Drink Mix was one of the biggest challenges in bringing this drink to the market. Almost all of the current endurance sports drinks use corn as a precursor for maltodextrin and citric acid. To get past this hurdle, we chose to use tapioca maltodextrin. It breaks down exactly like corn maltodextrin but removes the allergy symptoms that come from corn. Citric acid is typically derived from corn but can be found from a variety of fruits and plants. Our citric acid is derived from the molasses of beets and sugar cane.

    Originally, most of the research on caffeine and endurance athletes was at higher doses, 6 mg/kg and higher which would equate to 368 mg caffeine or about 3 cups coffee. According to research, caffeine enhances endurance performance in amounts of 3 mg/kg with little to no increased benefits in higher dosages. [1,2] Flow Formulas contains 184 mg caffeine which equates to about 3 mg/kg for a 135 pound individual.

    [1] Desbrow, B., Biddulph, C., Devlin, B., Grant, G. D., Anoopkumar-Dukie, S., & Leveritt, M. D. The effects of different doses of caffeine on endurance cycling time trial performance. Journal of Sports Sciences. 2012 Dec; 30(2), 115-120.

    [2] Desbrow, B., Irwin, C., Ellis, A., Okeeffe, B., Grant, G., & Leveritt, M. Caffeine Withdrawal and High Intensity Endurance Cycling Performance. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise. 2011 Mar; 42, 106.

    Below is a chart on how to train your gut to tolerate 90 grams of carbohydrate per hour.